Burmese Chickpea Tofu

Chickpeas, known for being a good source of fiber, protein, vitamins, and minerals, have become a wonderful ingredient for vegans and vegetarians in many recipes, including Burmese chickpea tofu. This tofu variation is the most popular among Burmese tofu types, originating from Myanmar and gaining popularity worldwide today.

burmese chickpea tofu

What is Burmese Chickpea Tofu

Chickpea Tofu is a version of Burmese tofu, a distinctive tofu type that has its roots in Myanmar, previously called Burma. Unlike the conventional soy-based tofu production method, which involves adding a coagulant to soy milk to produce tofu curds, Burmese tofu relies on the starch found in beans or peas to produce a solid block of tofu. This unique tofu variety has gained global recognition as a healthy and delicious plant-based protein option.

Various types of beans and peas can be used to make Burmese tofu, with Burmese chickpea tofu being the most popular variation. Burmese Chickpea Tofu, also known as “Shan tofu,” is made from chickpea or chickpea flour (gram flour) and water. With chickpea as the core ingredient, it is gluten-free, high in protein, and rich in essential nutrients, offering a unique flavor and texture.

The preparation involves mixing chickpea flour with water and seasoning to create a smooth batter, which is then heated and stirred until it thickens. Once it reaches a gel-like consistency, it can be poured into molds to set. After cooling, it solidifies into a block that can be sliced, diced, or cubed for various culinary applications.

How Does Burmese Chickpea Tofu Taste?

Burmese Chickpea Tofu has a milder and more subtle flavor compared to traditional soy-based tofu. It is nutty, earthy, and slightly bean-like. The unique flavor of chickpea sets it apart from other variations of Burmese tofu. While Chickpea tofu has a yellow color and smooth texture, traditional soy-based tofu tends to be more bready and whiter.

In terms of culinary applications, Burmese chickpea tofu can be fried, stir-fried, grilled, or used in soups, salads, and curries. Before incorporating the tofu into another dish, especially soups, it’s advisable to fry it to make it firmer. Due to its natural consistency from chickpea, it can easily break apart in water.

burmese chickpea tofu

Ingredients

  • 250g (8.8 oz) chickpeas/chickpea flour
  • 750ml (1.65 lb) water

You can use either whole chickpea, or chickpea flour. Whole chickpea is more popular, but it will take your time soaking, peeling and blending to be ready to cook. On the other hand, chickpea flour is a simpler choice. You just need to mix it with water and let it rest to absorb the water fully before cooking. However, I prefer the whole chickpea that I can use in plenty of recipes beside making Burmese chickpea tofu, from Hummus, Tahini sauce to Chickpea salads.

Chickpeas come in two main varieties – desi and kabuli. Desi chickpeas are smaller and darker, while kabuli chickpeas are larger and lighter in color. Both are good for making tofu. Look for clean, whole, and unblemished chickpeas. Avoid those with cracks, broken pieces, or insect damage. Check for any signs of moisture or mold in the package, as this can indicate poor storage conditions. If you’re buying dried chickpeas in bulk, ensure they’ve been stored in a cool, dry place. Proper storage prevents moisture absorption and extends their shelf life.

Also, avoid using canned chickpeas because the preservatives inside a can of chickpeas may prevent the tofu from thickening.

How To Make Chickpea Tofu

The method of making Burmese Chickpea tofu is similar to that of other Burmese tofu variations, such as Mung Bean tofu or Black Bean tofu. Here are the steps for making chickpea tofu:

Step 1. Preparation

  • If you are using chickpeas, rinse and soak them for at least 4 hours or overnight until they become soft and swell in size. Afterward, wash the beans again and transfer them to a blender.
  • If you are using chickpea flour, mix the flour with water directly and let it rest for at least 4 hours or overnight.

Step 2. Blending (if using chickpea)

  • If you are using chickpeas, add half of the required water to the blender and blend until the beans are finely ground, creating a chickpea batter.

Step 3. Cooking

  • Add the remaining water to the mixture and cook it on the stove until it thickens and becomes smooth, but not as dry as chickpea paste. Approximately 70-80% of the water should evaporate.
burmese chickpea tofu

Step 4. Cooling down

  • Prepare the mold by applying a thin layer of cooking oil to prevent sticking, then pour the mixture into the mold. Let it rest in the fridge for at least 2 hours.

Step 5. Frying

  • Check if your chickpea tofu is firm. You can then unmold it and cut it into bite-sized pieces, often resembling traditional tofu blocks or cubes. Fry them on medium heat until they turn golden brown.
burmese chickpea tofu

Storing Burmese Chickpea Tofu

Chickpea tofu should indeed be stored in the refrigerator to extend its freshness and prevent spoilage. After opening the package or container, transfer it to an airtight container or cover it with plastic wrap to shield it from odors and moisture. It’s advisable to consume your tofu within 2-3 days, as fresher tofu typically maintains its quality better.

burmese chickpea tofu

Easy Burmese Chickpea Tofu Recipe

Yield: 4
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 40 minutes

Burmese chickpea tofu is the most popular among Burmese tofu types, originating from Myanmar and gaining popularity worldwide today.

Ingredients

Instructions

Step 1. Preparation

  • If you are using chickpeas, rinse and soak them for at least 4 hours or overnight until they become soft and swell in size. Afterward, wash the beans again and transfer them to a blender.burmese chickpea tofu
  • If you are using chickpea flour, mix the flour with water directly and let it rest for at least 4 hours or overnight.

Step 2. Blending (if using chickpea)

  • If you are using chickpeas, add half of the required water to the blender and blend until the beans are finely ground, creating a chickpea batter.burmese chickpea tofu

Step 3. Cooking

  • Add the remaining water to the mixture and cook it on the stove until it thickens and becomes smooth, but not as dry as chickpea paste. Approximately 70-80% of the water should evaporate.burmese chickpea tofu

Step 4. Cooling down

  • Prepare the mold by applying a thin layer of cooking oil to prevent sticking, then pour the mixture into the mold. Let it rest in the fridge for at least 2 hours.burmese chickpea tofu

Step 5. Frying

  • Check if your chickpea tofu is firm. You can then unmold it and cut it into bite-sized pieces, often resembling traditional tofu blocks or cubes. burmese chickpea tofu
  • Fry them on medium heat until they turn golden brown.burmese chickpea tofu

Notes

Chickpea tofu should indeed be stored in the refrigerator to extend its freshness and prevent spoilage. After opening the package or container, transfer it to an airtight container or cover it with plastic wrap to shield it from odors and moisture. It's advisable to consume your tofu within 2-3 days, as fresher tofu typically maintains its quality better.

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Nutrition Information:
Yield: 4 Serving Size: 100g
Amount Per Serving: Calories: 90

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